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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

4 edition of Below-cost timber sales in the broad context of national forest management found in the catalog.

Below-cost timber sales in the broad context of national forest management

William E. Shands

Below-cost timber sales in the broad context of national forest management

by William E. Shands

  • 270 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Conservation Foundation in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States,
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • United States. Forest Service.,
    • Forest reserves -- United States -- Management.,
    • Timber -- Government policy -- United States.,
    • Forest policy -- United States.,
    • Lumber trade -- Government policy -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographies and index.

      Statementby William E. Shands and Thomas E. Waddell, with the assistance of German Reyes.
      SeriesA Research report from the Conservation Foundation
      ContributionsWaddell, Thomas E., Reyes, German.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSD427.T5 S53 1988
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxvi, 54 p. :
      Number of Pages54
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2043483M
      ISBN 100891641076
      LC Control Number88020328
      OCLC/WorldCa18191494

        lost money and the Agency was roundly criticized for “below cost timber sales,” i.e., timber sales that cost taxpayers more money to design, access and sell than they generate in revenue. The impact on Agency budgets was profound. The post-war housing boom created a market for timber from the national forests of the Rocky Mountains. The Forest Service suddenly faced an opportunity to expand national forest timber production, and it did so. Without implementing the vital concept of sustained yield, the Forest Service pushed timber sales.

      To better align with National Priorities and Objectives, this addendum to the Minnesota Forest Action Plan (FAP) includes a status check of strategies that are currently in process, implementation or on hold. Success Stories have also been included to highlight the state [s commitment to sustainable forest management. Except where. National Forests managed by the US Forest Service (USFS), which is housed in the US Department of Agriculture Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land is maily in the interior west, but there is a small but significant portion of BLM-managed forest land in Oregon.

      This revolution produced the greatest change in national forest management since the late s, when the agency's primary goal moved from fire suppression to timber sales. The effects of the more recent revolution are clearly shown by a chart showing that national forest timber sales have fallen by more than two-thirds. making larger timber sales in order to accelerate the rate of harvest of old-growth timber." (p. 82). After all, in the early s, with the absence of the widespread perspec tive that old-.


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Below-cost timber sales in the broad context of national forest management by William E. Shands Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Shands, William E. Below-cost timber sales in the broad context of national forest management.

Washington, D.C.: Conservation Foundation, © Below Cost Timber Sales in the Broad Context of National Forest Management (A Research report from the Conservation Foundation) Paperback Policies for the lake states forests: Final report of the Lake States Forest Policy Workshop, held at Rhinelander, Wisconsin, Febru 13, 14, William E.

Shands is the author of The Greenhouse Effect, Climate Change, and U.S. Forests ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), The La.

The National Forest Management Act in a Changing Society, How Well Has It Worked in the to set the standards for timber sales; 3. and to establish broad, substantive policies for timber harvesting. The Ninth Circuit has held that NFMA does not prohibit below-cost : David H. Getches. But the flood of new timber sales and the pressure on Forest Service managers to accommodate the demand for trees was unlike anything the agency had experienced in the prewar years.

The postwar period ushered in a new era of national forest administration, one that emphasized rapid logging and intensive management. National forest timber sales had been relatively consistent between and Afterhowever, as a result of court decisions, public pressure and management plans imposed to protect the northern spotted owl and other endangered species, national forest timber sale.

Interestingly, the amount of timber that the national forest can offer for sale over the life of the plan (the allowable sales quantity) is unchanged from level described in the plan, or approximately million board feet (MMBF) (, m 3) per year over a year period (–).

[3] GAO, Tongass National Forest: Forest Service's Actions Related to Its Planned Timber Program Transition, GAO, at 6(Washington, D.C.: Ap ). The Forest Service defines productive forest as forested areas that contain or can produce a minimum volume of timber per acre-specifically, either a volume of 8, board feet of standing timber or an annual per-acre.

The Forest Service moved into the post–World War II era intent on meeting the growing national need for timber by intensifying management to maximize tree production.

By the s, the overriding goal was to “get out the cut.” Private forest lands could no longer meet the growing demand for wood products, so national forests filled in the.

culture, and forest planning. I advise the novice to fist read an earlier publication (Norse et al. ) for background material.

Refomzing the Forest Service was written by natural resource econo- mist Randal O’Toole, who has spent many years analyzing forest plans and timber sales. This book contains a wealth of data in crisp tables and. Below-cost timber sales - sales where the federal government makes less from the sale than it cost to build access roads and sell the timber - emerged as a controversy in national forest management as the nation's economy came under stress in the late s.

Below-cost timber sales in the broad context of national forest management / by William E. Shands and Thomas E. Waddell, with the assistance of German Reyes. Washington, D.C.: Conservation Foundation, c SDT6 S56 The taking of the Tongass: Alaska's rainforest / by Bill Shoaf.

Sequim, WA: Running Wolf Press, c SDN45 The JFSQ provides data for supply balances of timber used for wood products and for energy, and for estimating the carbon contained in harvested wood products. The collection of forest accounts re-started in after a break of several years, As in the s, it was known as Integrated Environmental and Economic Accounting for Forests (IEEAF).

The latest round of forest planning, in which every Forest Service region and national forest developed comprehensive, NFMA directed forest plans, was basically completed by the end of ; however, numerous appeals and lawsuits by the timber industry and environmental and other groups have delayed the implementation of many of these plans.

Robert Wolf discusses the history of the Forest Service from to the s. He describes the below-cost timber sales and Forest Service management goals, including justifications for deficit sales beginning with Giffort Pinchot in and continuing into the s.

He mentions other issues. The consensus of the range management personnel of the Agency is that the measures are not adequate. Based on the recommendations from the review of below-cost timber sales (USDA Forest Service c), the GAO made it clear that the timber harvesting program on National Forests should compare actual costs and benefits.

Fire: National Forest Fire Prevention Workshop. approx. Fire: National Forest Fire Report approx. Fire: Natural Resources Management, History of Wildfire Management. approx. 25 p. Fire: North American Forest Fire Medal.

approx. 50 p. Fire: Plan to Aid USDA in Effort to Reduce Forest Fires. approx. 50 p. Though the issue of below-cost sales (timber sales in which the Forest Service receives less for the sale than the costs of building access roads and cutting the timber) was raised in the s, environmental organizations hammered the issue home to the press and public in the s.

•Revenues gained from timber sales are below cost of administering the sale ( Forest Service lost $m) •Below-cost sales concentrated in forests with low timber values and/or high operating costs •Concentrated in certain areas: Alaska, Rockies, Southeast, Lake States, New England.

A sweeping overview of American forest history from before the arrival of Europeans to the late twentieth century. Williams provides a broad, national context from which to explore Washington's forest history.

Videos. Videos offer another way for students to engage the history of forests and logging. On below-cost timber sales, see generally Kenneth R. Barrett, Note, Section 6(k) of the National Forest Management Act: The Bottom Line on Below-Cost Timber Sales.The National Forest Management Act of provided the mandate for development of integrated Forest Plans that now guide the management of each National Forest.

The Farm Bill provided an expanded mandate for technical assistance by the Forest Service to State and private forest landowners, and provided a significantly expanded role in.

Yes, it costs a lot more to prepare timber sales that cut trees with an average of 14″ dbh. And, yes, we also have “below cost” wildfires, bark beetles and drought. The Equal Access to Justice Act is also “below cost”. National Parks are still “below cost”, even after HUGE increases in entrance fees.

Even our wars are “below.